Classes of Service

Your "class of service" is among the most important pieces of information you can know. Most aspects of SERS' classes of service are defined by Pennsylvania's State Employees' Retirement Code. Among other things, the law dictates your class of service multiplier, how much you contribute to SERS, at what age you can retire without a penalty, how long it takes for you to earn the right to a monthly benefit upon retirement, and whether or not you can withdraw your own contributions from SERS when you retire.

Your class of service is determined largely by when you became a SERS member and the work that you do. In most cases, your class of service will be determined by when you were first enrolled in SERS as a state employee. If you leave state service and later return, it is very important that you let your HR office know.

SERS has more than a dozen classes of service. If you became a SERS member after January 1, 2011, your class of service is most likely A-3 or A-4. If you were first enrolled in SERS before January 1, 2011, your class of service is most likely A or AA. Details of these are provided in the "Most Common Classes of Service" table below. Following the table are additional details about benefits for Pennsylvania State Police.

Other classes of service cover legislators elected before December 2010, judges, and magisterial district judges. Details of these are provided in the "Less Common Classes of Service" table below.

If you believe you may belong to a class of service not presented here, please call 1.800.633.5461.

Most Common Classes of Service
Class of Service
A-3
A-4
A
AA
Who is a Member
of the Class

Most employees who became SERS members on or after January 1, 2011

Legislators who became members on or after December 1, 2010

Capitol police officers and park ranges who became members on or after July 1, 2011

State police officers who became members on or after July 1, 2012
Class A-3 members who, within the first 45 days of employment, voluntarily elected to contribute more to earn a higher class of service multiplier

Most employees who became SERS members prior to July 1, 2001 who did not elect AA during the specific timeframe specified in Act 2001-9

Most employees who became SERS members between July 1, 2001 and January 1, 2011

Class A members who, during a specific timeframe specified by Act 2001-9, voluntarily elected to contribute more to earn a higher class of service multiplier
Member
Contribution Rate
6.25% of salary 9.3% of salary 5.0% of salary 6.25% of salary
Member Rate Can Rise if Investment Performance is Poor

Yes Yes No No
Class of Service Multiplier

1.00

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rate of 2%

1.25

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rate of 2.5%)

1.00

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rate of 2%)

1.25

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rate of 2.5%)
Vested
After 10 years of credited service After 10 years of credited service After 5 years of credited service After 5 years of
credited service
SERS Normal
Retirement Age

Age 65 for most members

Age 55 for corrections officers, Delaware River Port Authority police officers, enforcement officers, legislators, psychiatric security aides, and state police officers

Age 55 for capitol police officers and park rangers who have 20 or more years of service in those jobs

Age 65 for most members

Age 55 for corrections officers, Delaware River Port Authority police officers, enforcement officers, legislators, psychiatric security aides, and state police officers

Age 55 for capitol police officers and park rangers who have 20 or more years of service in those jobs

Age 60 for most members

Age 50 for corrections officers, Delaware River Port Authority police officers, enforcement officers, legislators, psychiatric security aides, and state police officers

Age 50 for capitol police officers and park rangers who have 20 or more years of service in those jobs

Age 60 for most members

Age 50 for corrections officers, Delaware River Port Authority police officers, enforcement officers, legislators, psychiatric security aides, and state police officers

Age 50 for capitol police officers and park rangers who have 20 or more years of service in those jobs
Eligible for
Unreduced Retirement

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

Any age if you have 35 years of service and your years of service plus your age equals at least 92

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

Any age if you have 35 years of service and your years of service plus your age equals at least 92

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

Any age if you have 35 years of service

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

Any age if you have 35 years of service
Member Can
Withdraw Contributions upon Retirement
No No Yes
with reduced monthly payments
Yes
with reduced monthly payments
Cost to Purchase
Non-State Service
Most service based on cost to provide benefits Military service based on salary when you became a member Most service based on cost to provide benefits Military service based on salary when you became a member Based on salary when you became a member Based on salary when you became a member

 

Retirement Benefits for Pennsylvania State Police

A collective bargaining agreement provides for the possibility of a different pension calculation for Pennsylvania State Police. This is often called the "DiLauro Award."

In general, if you work as a state trooper at any time on or after July 1, 1989 and you retire with less than 20 years of service, then your retirement is based on the class of service above that which would otherwise apply to you.

If, however, you retire with more than 20 but less than 25 years, then rather than using the typical pension formula, your retirement will be based on 50% of your highest year's earnings, excluding the year in which you retire.

If you continue to work and retire with more than 25 years of service, then your retirement will be based on 75% of your highest year's earnings, excluding the year in which you retire.

To learn more about the DiLauro award, please call 1.800.633.5461.

Less Common Classes of Service
Class of Service
D4
E1
E2
Who is a Member
of the Class

Most Legislators elected between July 1, 2001 and December 1, 2010

Legislators who, during a specific timeframe specified by Act 2001-9, voluntarily elected to contribute more to earn a higher class of service multiplier
Judges Magisterial district judges

Member
Contribution Rate

7.5% of salary

10.0% of salary first 10 years

7.5% of salary thereafter
7.5% of salary
Member Rate Can Rise if Investment Performance is Poor

No No No
Class of Service Multiplier

1.5

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rate of 3%)

2.0 first 10 years

1.5 thereafter

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rates of 4% and 3%)

1.5

(x 2% in the pension formula yields benefit accrual rate of 3%)
Vested
After 5 years of service After 5 years of service After 5 years of service

SERS Normal
Retirement Age

Age 50 Age 60 Age 60

Eligible for
Unreduced Retirement

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

Any age, if you have 35 years of service

SERS normal retirement age with 3 years of credited service

Any age, if you have 35 years of service

Member Can
Withdraw Contributions upon Retirement

Yes Yes Yes

Cost to Purchase
Non-State Service

Based on salary when you became a member Based on salary when you became a member Based on salary when you became a member